Tall Love by Michelle McEwen

No more giving away what I got and gettin’ nothing back. I give my heart, my time, and what’s between my legs and all I get is a bunch of men’s backs on their way out the door. My old honey thought I was sleeping when he snuck out. I was awake, though— watched him tiptoeing out. Funny sight— grown men tiptoeing. I cried a spell about it, but no more of that nonsense crying for me. I’m at that age where my folks starting to drop like flies and I need my tears for them. Too old to be weepin’ over menfolk, too old for this one-sided love I keep gettin’. Aunt Tookie says I love too hard— says no man’s love ever gonna match how I love. That’s ‘cause I got this way of lovin’ that if I took my love, put it up against a wall, and marked off the height with a pencil, every day it’d be taller— a growing child. What I got is tall love. My men got short love; no matter what you do, it don’t grow. Unless I find a man with tall love, my legs staying closed. Gonna need a password to get ‘em open again. Won’t be no simple password like I love you. It’s gon’ be something tough like “Baby, I been all over Chicago. Had me some moneyed women, yellow women, plump women, but they got nothin’ on the one I got layin’ up next to me.”

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19 Comments

Filed under Michelle McEwen

19 responses to “Tall Love by Michelle McEwen

  1. shaneshane

    men’s backs on their way out the door, ha

  2. Thanks for reading, ShaneShane

  3. Melissa

    You’re gooooood. I especially like: “That’s ‘cause I got this way of lovin’ that if I took my love, put it up against a wall, and marked off the height with a pencil, every day it’d be taller— a growing child.”

  4. I like the naive quality of this narrator, the almost sing-song voice, its a real sweet story.

  5. First of all, Michelle, thank you for commenting on “Sweet Tea.” Second of all, I love your story “Tall Love”–the metaphor is beautiful, the voice is distinct (as always), the last line is pure poetry.

    Finally, when I sent in my submission, I told the editors that when I wrote my story “Sweet Tea,” I was purposely trying to emulate the style of Michelle and Melissa McEwen, whose voices and prose styles are so beautiful, and yet so different than my own. That you responded to it in some way pleases me immensely. Thanks. Dan

  6. guy

    There’s a lot here: the vulnerability of the narrator, her motivations for taking these shorties into her bed, her optimism.

    You just know that even a long, fancy password isn’t going to do it.

    Great stuff, as usual.

  7. Thanks for your comment, Dan! It made my day!

    I enjoyed Sweet Tea very much. My sister read it first and emailed me telling me to read it.

  8. Guy, thanks for your comment.

    “You just know that even a long, fancy password isn’t going to do it.” — I like this. Nice and story-sounding.

  9. Great voice, and I liked the image of love being measured like height.

  10. Yes, the voice – I can hear it – I’d love to listen to you read your piece with some stridin’ blues in the background. Doris

  11. Yes, with you it is always the voice, the wonderful voice! I want to take voice lessons from you! I sing soprano ;^)

    I like this woman’s determination to keep her legs straight. Reminds me of Beyonce’s put a ring on it, but this has so much more soul. Gorgeous, per usual, what I always expect. Peace…

  12. Voice lessons– cute. Thanks for the comment.

  13. Darryl P.

    Love this!

  14. The voice does have such a lyrical quality to it, as do many of your wonderful stories. Great work again this week!

  15. great voice. it really worked and was believable.

  16. Nicely done, there’s a deeper story here within her decision.

  17. Kelly

    the optimism of the growin child, the obstinence of an older woman with experience, and nicely balanced throughout – I liked this very much

  18. Pingback: Week #39 – Password | 52|250 A Year of Flash

  19. Michael

    [reposted from Facebook] Michelle, I loved this, especially this whole section: “Aunt Tookie says I love too hard— says no man’s love ever gonna match how I love. That’s ‘cause I got this way of lovin’ that if I took my love, put it up against a wall, and marked off the height with a pencil, every day it’d be taller— a growing child.” I love the narrator’s gumption! Great writing, once again.

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