Black Square by Stephen Hastings-King

She says: I don’t know what happened to my little Jean-Pierre. I was getting water about a hundred feet of curious hermetic stillness from where I left him playing.  I turned in time to watch him disappear into the black square of the world.

Inside the television monitor positioned next to the window children were being declared orphans based on photographs.  The idea breaks into concentric rings produced on the high tide surface of the marsh by the rain.  My sightline follows a radiating wave.

Across the water a red version of my car floats in the air above the trees.  It is tethered to the ground with a yellow line.  Sitting in the passenger seat, Jean-Pierre smokes cigarettes and waits.  He is careful to minimize his movements.  He closes his eyes.

She says: I don’t know what happened to my little Jean-Pierre. I was getting water about a hundred feet from where I left him playing.  I turned in time to watch him disappear.

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3 Comments

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3 responses to “Black Square by Stephen Hastings-King

  1. guy

    I don’t know why, but even after reading all the Calamities over the past few months, i’m just now taking stock of how visual they are. The mathematical-philosophical idiom can be read as mathematical-philosophical metaphor & also in the concrete, especially here. I ask myself why it is more apparent in this particular bit. I should go back and see how that dualism plays out over the whole thing.

  2. stephen

    thanks, comrade.
    actually this doesn’t come out of the calamity project…i just forgot to send a different bio same as the last one but without the last sentence that says everything is part of the same project. anyway…

    i’ve been working with a stripped-out way of describing things that i imagine functions as visual for other people (it does for me). the idea is to make sentences that leave ranges for projection pretty open. that’s why i try to make the sentences tight, take out everything that seems extra (except when i don’t manage to do it) and work with kind of abstract(ed) voices.

    but it’s hard to gauge such things, how they work (or don’t) for readers who aren’t in your skull.

    let me know if the calamity changes….

  3. Pingback: Week #9 – archive | 52|250 A Year of Flash

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