To Be Fair by Michael Webb



“Come on,” I said to no one in particular. “They didn’t just DISAPPEAR.”
 
“What didn’t dis-pear, Momma?,” Conor said. He was three, with hair still a rat’s nest and pajama bottoms under his dinosaur shirt.
 
“My shoes, honey. Go get your sister and put your pants on.”
 
“Momma, shoes are over ‘dere!,” Conor insisted.
 
“No, honey. Not those. Go find your sister. KAITLYN!, ” I called.
 
“Yes, Mom,” she said, coming around the corner. She was less and less girl every minute, it seemed.
 
“Help your brother with his pants. I need to find my black pumps.”
 
“I didn’t take them,” she added swiftly.
 
“I didn’t say you did, honey. Go help your brother.”
 
“OK,” she said warily.
 
I could wear other shoes, I thought. But those were the perfect ones for this suit. I walked back into my bedroom in stockinged feet. I had gone through them all, even the ones in the back I wore to parties and formal occasions, and they weren’t there.
 
Conor wandered back in, now in jeans and sneakers and his dinosaur shirt, hair wet and no longer sticking out. “Good work, Kaitlyn,” I thought.
 
“Momma’s shoes ‘peared again?”, he asked.
 
“No, honey,” I said sadly.
 
“They gone? Denny Dragon burn them up?”
 
“No, honey. Dragons aren’t real.”
 
In his world, evil cartoon dragons burned things to cinders. To be fair, it worked as well as any explanation I had.

.

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9 Comments

Filed under Michael Webb

9 responses to “To Be Fair by Michael Webb

  1. Aw, cute take on the theme!

  2. John Riley

    I like the hint that it worked that way in her world too.

  3. Len

    nice voice and strong finish.

  4. Well done dialogue that perfectly paced the movement of the story.

  5. Great dialogue, and very cute. peace…

  6. Kim Hutchinson

    Nice. Dragons work for me…

  7. grey johnson

    Enjoyable read, and I’m wondering if they were ever found!

  8. Al McDermid

    Love how you conveyed so much action with mostly dialog. And the ending was great–very funny.

  9. Pingback: Week #33 – Spontaneous combustion | 52|250 A Year of Flash

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