Monologue by Chelsea Biondolillo

Some girls remember their first time in all kinds of detail: like what song was on the radio and if the guy was wearing cologne and what underwear they had on. I hear them talking in the locker room while they put their eyeshadow back on after PE and recurl their hair.

You know, I can’t get my hair to curl right no matter how much hairspray I use? I’ve tried, and it always falls flat by second period. I don’t get foundation either. It looks too thick on me. So when they’re at the mirrors, I don’t have anything ‘constructive to contribute,’ as Mr. Taske says.

When they start blabbing about their boyfriends, I just get dressed and hustle out behind the art building for a quick smoke before English. What am I supposed to say when those Barbie girls start gushing about how they finally “went all the way” with some dumb football player?

Someday I might just blurt out, “I think mine’s name was Cary, and he pushed me down in the woods.” Wouldn’t that shut them up? I’d like to tell them that: tell them what it feels like to float away while a thing’s done to you, so you don’t have to really remember it. I’d like to watch them turn away from the mirror for a second and see something other than their own glassy eyes. But that’s what Mr. Taske would say is ‘disruptive social behavior.’ It’s not helpful, he says.

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8 Comments

Filed under Chelsea Biondolillo

8 responses to “Monologue by Chelsea Biondolillo

  1. Hard hitting, surprise attack for the reader. Very well done, Chelsea.

  2. Len

    clever use of the theme. i liked how you wove in the mirror and hair and the opening really sucked me in.

  3. The glassy eyes and the mirror was a nice touch.

  4. Thank you all for the feedback!

  5. This piece packs a punch! Great use of descriptive words and setting details. I like the dialogue references and tags too. What people say, how it gets interpreted. Nicely spun.

  6. Kim Hutchinson

    Very strong story. I feel so sad for this girl. She just wants to be seen and heard.

  7. Great voice, pitch-perfect. Really picks up on the social clique and mores of high school. Peace…

  8. Pingback: Week #34 – Floating away | 52|250 A Year of Flash

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