Standing Next To The Afternoon by Jill Chan

He wanted to be inevitable today. No one at home. He is standing next to the afternoon. An indefinite day—a day wide open, shut closed to his efforts.

He tried reading but even the book is closed. But he is drowning in words that recall her. She has left with everything the day couldn’t open. He has arrived at a place she’ll never forget.

And he is ready at last. By himself, he is stubborn as someone who could not be deserted. War in a time of battle.

And they fought even now. He would think of things he hated about her and draw swords as sharp as her mind. They lost together.

Night is falling on him. He can feel the weight of her beauty desecrating the dark. How ominous is love when darkened by sorrow. When improper sight is held close by our wandering. For she is his sight and vision. His wants of holy desire.

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7 Comments

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7 responses to “Standing Next To The Afternoon by Jill Chan

  1. Michael Parker

    This is utterly gorgeous prose, Jill, as always. This is a beautiful companion work to my Night stories that I’ve been writing — I feel so connected to your narrator and her/his relationship to the day and night and love. This is my absolute favorite: “When improper sight is held close by our wandering. For she is his sight and vision.” Beautiful!

  2. Pingback: Flash fiction in 52250 A Year of Flash « Jill-Chan.com

  3. Yes, gorgeous. Especially the first two paragraphs ring for me – beautifully rendering the abstract into substance – like I have to turn my head a bit to see it, and I do see, and it’s great.

  4. Melissa McEwen

    Love the title.

    And the story is very poetic.

  5. I liked the title also, the idea of standing next to something that is not an object, per se. Or what is it? And your use of prose poetry makes the lilting effect of your prose linger.

  6. Love the tension here, built on the words. I especially loved the third stanza. Peace…

  7. Pingback: Week #41 – Coincidence | 52|250 A Year of Flash

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